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Digital Citizenship

Page history last edited by vbranom@gmail.com 10 years, 10 months ago

This page has been created to store all the ideas we find on Digital Citizenship, including ways to teach it to students in the k-12 setting.

 

Digital Citizenship is Thing #11 in the Library2Play 2 11.5 More Things online professional program.

The majority of the responses below come from the participants in that program.

 


First, some framework: I work with elementary students in a highly filtered environment, so many of the fun things I am learning here will not be accessible to my students. That's whyRhonda's Reflections blog on digital literacy resonated with me. Access is an important roadblock for us with so many sites blocked. And yet, it is so important to have access to teach.

Next, something to look into: Deep_web resources:"As much as I love Google, to depend entirely on Google is akin to our total dependence on Microsoft in the late 1980's and most of the 1990's. I believe that variety and diversity is an important part of the Internet. I have as an objective of mine to integrate more deep web resources into my classroom and teaching. " Vicki Davis in her Cool Cat Teacher blog on interview with Robert McLaughlin. That is probably for middle and/or high school students, but for me as a teacher as well to look into.

Finally, the lessons I teach: I did see the Digiteen project by Westwood schools on Woogi World which we like as well. It does a good job explaining safety, passwords, what to do if you run into something you don't like, etc... The kids like it,and our IT people are comfortable with it so we have access. I also use lessons from CyberBee on plagiarismfair use, citations, web site evalutations, and Big 6 model research. I also have students get their Internet drivers license from pbs kids. usually as a review of etiquette lessons. I have the both sets of the ISTE standardsposted above my desk to keep me on task when I am creating lessons in the library, as well as AASL's info literacy standards. Every year I try to incorporate more standards as I collaborate with teachers on different projects during the year, but I am doing fewer "library lessons" as time goes on, so some of this gets abbreviated and/or integrated into the projects. I am trying to find a scaffolded approach from grades 2-5 so that we just keep building on skill sets each year.

 

 


I pulled this information from the NETS-T Keeping in mind that I am teaching the youngest learners, I have to bring this information down to their level, first teaching about citizenship in the classroom and taking turns on our two computers...

Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

It is my responsibility to:

a. advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright,

intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources

In the PK classroom this would look like demonstrating using the computer and having a think aloud as I share research information, videos and music. I would ask questions to prompt their thinking about obtaining and using digital information.

b. address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools

and resources

In the PK classroom this would look like setting up a user schedule where all children have access to technology.

c. promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information

In the PK classroom this would look like demonstrating respect for student products by printing out/ saving the work they choose and displaying it in a manner that they can share their discoveries with peers and parents. Modeling for children how to appropriately critique a friend's work.

d. develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using

digital-age communication and collaboration tools

In the PK classroom this would look like demonstrating the use of online tools and giving age appropriate access and introducing "things" I feel the students might enjoy, like Wordles, for example.

 

Posted by Ms.Bojangles

 


So, if I were to name 5 top items to focus on this concept with my students during their Library orientation - these would be :

1. Where & Why - I will have to go over all the technology available to them next year which will be much more than was available last year. Then I will need to discuss a sort of priority list .. why do I need an itouch rather than a laptop? questions like that to make sure students are choosing a technology that fits their needs & not taking up technology-time with our equipment in a frivolous manner.

2. Access - how to access our digital information. I will show students subscription databases & discuss sites open & some blocked at the school level. How to make alternative choices when they are at school - for example if you tube is blocked try teacher tube .. etc.

3. Literacy - so many students do not seek information when they are online. Help menus - tutorials - & plain old reading .. escape them. So, I wish to impress upon them there is a certain skill level to teach yourself & locate information when you encounter a new technology online.

4.Privilege - now that I have them excited about our new technology - I would discuss privilege & taking care of things that we are lucky to have ... pointing to our district's AUP will take place here.

5. Etiquette - I'm thinking I can jumble together the concepts of safety, using correct online etiquette, & paying attention to copyright .. giving credit .. fair use etc... Good luck, right??

My digital lesson will hopefully include a little technology petting zoo - in which I will have out a lot of the new technology that we have available to them. I would have some of these attached to a video projector so I can share things like the difference between using open office & Microsoft Office. I would also have a handout that includes tips .. & post all of this info on my website/blog for them. I think as a reinforcement .. & since I rarely get enough time to talk to students - I want to create a little fun online web quest or something along those lines for them to do at home on their computer.

 

 


A list of important points might look something like this...

1. Characteristics of a good citizenship in a digital world

2. Cyber-bullying examples (new DVDs in library's collection)

3. Plagiarism/piracy/copyright laws- examples of copyright friendly/free-share resources and Citing Sources (Noodletools)

4. Safety on the Internet (privacy, sharing of information, Internet friends, chat rooms (Youtube video of Facebook Etiquette)

5. How to evaluate a website for valid information (PPT in Librarian Sharefolder)

6. Discuss expectation, rules and appropriate behavior in line with district policies.

 

Since we have the students using email, a Ning, and conducting web-based research we made sure we spent some serious time on digital citizenship. Here are the highlights of the lesson we taught:

 

  • What does it mean to be a citizen?
  • Characteristics of a citizen
  • What is a digital world?
  • Student definition of digital citizenship
  • Cyber-bullying examples and student created def'n
  • SBISD's AUP policy
  • Posting/blogging/emails and appropriate etiquette/behavior
  • Plagiarism/piracy/copyright laws- examples of copyright friendly/free-share resources
  • Citing Sources
  • Safety on the Internet (privacy, sharing of information, Internet friends, chat rooms)
  • Determining if a website is valid and reliable Examples of fake websites
  • What do do if you come across inappropriate behavior or inappropriate material (student generated).
  • Student created rules and behavior of digital citizenship

 

Making students aware that there are expectations, rules, and appropriate behavior to use in the digital classroom is a must. After our lesson, each team created a list of rules and expectations for digital citizenship which we have posted in each classroom. We also review expectations and rules prior to a technology based lesson. Many of the students were familiar with cyber bullying and Internet safety but a lot of them were having a hard time with copyright (especially with images). I had to readdress this issue with many of the students and I even had to remove some pictures from our Ning :(. I think if we keep teaching digital citizenship as a district, our students will soon become experts.

 


http://digiteen.ning.com/

http://www.kidsmart.org.uk/

Above are 2 wonderful links on teaching digital citizenship. The first is a ning for teenagers where they can get involved in discussions and ask questions and the second is more for elementary or ESL students.

  • After reading information found on many of the sites, I realize that I'm not as informed as I thought I was about digital citizenship. Theresonsibility rests not only in parents hands, but in all educators' as well. I found a quote from the digiteen site that said, "We need to teach behavior that allows us to use the best filtering tool that the world has ever seen: the human brain."
  • I have seen my students search the Internet quickly for information and then just look at the very first few sites given. They then either give up or take the information as "gospel" without going any further. Most believe everything that is posted without questioning the validity of the source. We must teach our students how to evaluate sites and URL's for validity. That means I must learn as much as possible about rankings and validity on the Internet.

    Stephen Downes says, "Indeed, a person who reads a website and concludes that it's true, no matter what it says, is dangerously illiterate."

  • Safety of my students is also a major concern. I must teach them personal safety and standards of conduct. I think for my ESL students they would learn this best through scenarios and discussions.
 

Posted by skz  

 


I am going to use this post not only as a means to satisfy the 11.5 requirements, but also as a place to “park my plans”, too - including some of the useful quotes I find at the different sites noted to visit…so here we go….

If students take the “first thing they come to” to determine their opinion, then we are sorely at the mercy of Google’s algorithms and the determination of webmasters who desire to be heard. Understanding how to search, how to validate sources, and even how to use deep web resources is an essential part of being literate. (Cool Cat Teacher blog)

David Warlicksays, “Instead of starting with a web page, displayed on the whiteboard, they [teachers] should start with Google, demonstrate how they found the page, the considerations and decisions they applied to select that page, and include in the presentation, the evidence that what’s being presented is valuable…When we model authority, we shouldn’t be surprised when students look for authority in every piece of information.”

Kristin Hokanson says,“At the upper level, kids need to be taught HOW to access credible sources…via data bases, advanced google searches and other good search strategies. If we don’t, they will continue to go to the first sources available. “

Gary Stager(from his comments over at David Warlick’s blog) says, “Of course everyone should use multiple sources. The reason this is such a problem online is that it has rarely been done offline.”

The focus here is that students are not where they need to be with the skills encompassed in digital citizenship. It is a process and cannot just be taught by one teacher one time and expect retention.

It must permeate all subjects in all grade levels just like reading, for increasingly it is reading.

After having read CoolCat’s post, one thing resonates for me - and I’m VERY guilty of it - that kids need to be TAUGHT how to research, regardless of where the research is happening!  Just as I wouldn’t just take my class to the library and say, “Have at it! Good luck!” without preteaching and modeling, I shouldn’t just “dump” them on the computer, and assume that since they are teenagers in the 21st century they will know what to do.  I should be a little more fair to myself, though.  I HAVE done some teaching about safe web sources, but realize now that I have woefully undertaught.  So, here’s the plan…

Lesson 1 - Safety and guidelines

Lesson 2 - Digital Responsibility (I think this is one lesson I’d keep coming back to, and review responsible behavior relative to the application we’re using).

Lesson 3 - Deconstruct a web page to find author, date of “publication”, etc.

Lesson 4 - Discuss what makes a source reliable or not

Lesson 5 - Webquest to evaluate various sites

Lesson 6 - Web authoring - responsible use of online resources; copyrights, plagiarism, etc.

I agree with I <heart> bibliophiles, in that we have to continue to teach these guidelines consistently throughout the district, to all students, so that when they get out into     [NOTE: the blog posted ended here with the incomplete sentence]

 

by flyingpig  


I pulled this information from the NETS-T Keeping in mind that I am teaching the youngest learners, I have to bring this information down to their level, first teaching about citizenship in the classroom and taking turns on our two computers...

Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

It is my responsibility to:

a. advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright,

intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources

In the PK classroom this would look like demonstrating using the computer and having a think aloud as I share research information, videos and music. I would ask questions to prompt their thinking about obtaining and using digital information.

b. address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools

and resources

In the PK classroom this would look like setting up a user schedule where all children have access to technology.

c. promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information

In the PK classroom this would look like demonstrating respect for student products by printing out/ saving the work they choose and displaying it in a manner that they can share their discoveries with peers and parents. Modeling for children how to appropriately critique a friend's work.

d. develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using

digital-age communication and collaboration tools

In the PK classroom this would look like demonstrating the use of online tools and giving age appropriate access and introducing "things" I feel the students might enjoy, like Wordles, for example.

 

 

  


Being a good citizen is at the heart of most of what I do in the library. I'm hoping to promote the creation of good people. Digital citizenship seems important.

I can see a need to encourage children to look carefully at information, wherever it is obtained. The first time this hit home with me was in an upper level history class in college. We were asked to read a book about a key figure in the Cold War era of America. The key figure was depicted as manipulative and cruel. Part of our assignment was, after reading the book, to look up information about the author. Very revealing. The author, it seems, is a Socialist who was harmed during the Cold War!

So, all sources of information---newspapers, books, encyclopedias, the Net---all should be carefully examined for truth and bias. 

I will think out what possible lessons I could use with my bambinos on digital citizenship.

 

Posted by debnance  


http://www.kenton.k12.ky.us/internet_safety/default.htm

The above link from Kenton County School District have their nine themes they want their students to understand and I think they are right on.

1. Digital Etiquette - electronic standards of conduct or procedure 

2. Digital Communication - electronic exchange of information 

3. Digital Literacy - process of teaching and learning about technology and the use of technology 

4. Digital Access - full electronic participation in society 

5. Digital Commerce - electronic buying and selling of goods 

6. Digital Law - electronic responsibility for actions and deeds 

7. Digital Rights & Responsibilities - those freedoms extended to everyone in a digital world 

8. Digital Health & Wellness - physical and psychological well-being in a digital technology world 

9. Digital Security (self-protection) - electronic precautions to guarantee safety. 

 

posted by Lee  


This is something that I teach every year to every grade. I feel that it is very important for students know their responsibility to being good technology users. This is one of those times that you must "teach" the students. Just like being a good citizen means taking care of your neighborhood, being a good digital citizen is knowing how to use the proper tool for the job you need to get done, and using the right resources to get the correct answers. I spend a lot of time working with students to know proper "netiquette", using the right tools and resources and being good observers - reading screens, checking the authors of websites, checking information given. We've had some good discussions when conflicting information has been found on several sites...great way to show how important it is to check the facts. We want students to take ownership of their learning, but....we need to instruct them on expectations and provide them with guidance. I especially liked the graphic with the four boxes and student in the middle...it summarizes it all...you need all four parts to be successful with the digital enviroment...once it is part of the students knowledge...then they can go forth and learn on their own....having respect/netiquett is important...as through the digital world you may send an e-mail or comment on a blog of someone you never meet in person...technology can not just be taught in a lab...it must be integrated into all subjects and more importantly into life. I don't just have one lesson on digital citizenship...I teach it all the time...as it best fits...integrated into the curriculum. 

Posted by RCELibrarian  


The question posed was what would you tell students during orientation about digital citizenship. I think it really needs to start before the students arrive. The ISTE documents, NETS-S for students and the NETS-T for teachers are a good starting place for discussion with teachers and administration. We've had schoolwide semester goals for new behavior modification guidelines. Why not pick a few things to accomplish school wide from these? I would consider copying these for each teacher, maybe highlighting some things that they already do so it isn't so daunting. Need to think more but they are good places to start the conversation.

 

From Cool Cat Teacher's post I would say we need to concentrate on the modeling. Not just showing the website, database, etc, but talking through our search, our decision making process, much like primary teachers talk through, model, the reading of a book and the internal questions a reader poses and answers. I know that too often, due to time restraints, I dash to the site and don't always show them the journey, or the journeys, I took on the way to deciding to use that site.

Validating a source is a hard concept for elementary kids. They think everything they find is real, fact, there for altruistic reasons... I once suggested to a group of third graders that if they are not being honest, (some had already admitted to lying about their age to use My Space and others), others could be dishonest too. The cute 13 year old boy/girl they are chatting with could really be a 52 year old man. Seeing the realization and then horror that slowly crept over their faces was a powerful experience for me. I can only hope it was for them too.

The Digiteen Wiki was also interesting. I thought I could use the Rights and Responsibilities section with the students. Telling them that it was written by students would gain a little interest and then we could discuss statements from it.

A lot of what was discussed as digital citizenship really mirrors much of what happens in SBISD elementary schools during the first weeks. Classes discuss and work on community building, behavior expectations, respect, teamwork and consequences for not adhering to the community's guidelines.

I had a lot of other thoughts as I read through all of the writings. I especially like the notion of explaining that digital footprints don't wash away like footprints in the sand. There is a book, Feathers by Heather Forest that could go along with this idea that once you say or write something, it's out there and you can't take it back.

I think I was supposed to come up with 5 things to talk to the kids about during the beginning of the year. On Educational Origami, the tenets were respect yourself, protect yourself, respect others, protect others, don't steal, honor intellectual property - seems like a good place to start.

 

by Terry 

 


As an elementary teacher I would focus on safety first. Making sure that they don't give out any personal information. There are too many wolves out there posing as sheep. The 2nd thing I would discuss would be sites that are ok and sites that are not ok. 3rd I would talk about how get out of a bad situations or site. 4th would be when doing research do believe everything you read. Just b/c it is on the internet does not make it true. And finally I would work on the what is ok and not okay to copy and or use in their work. 

jb 

 


Of course, I'm of the opinion that we should talk to kids about most everything. At their level, of course, but fairly openly. Kids don't educate each other accurately. So if an adult doesn't do the talking and the guiding, then you're leaving it up to their friends. Since our executive functioning doesn't fully develop until we're in our 20's, we're taking a pretty big risk in expecting they'll get a good education from their peers.

In reading a number of the posts, I inwardly shouted, "Amen!" I think we spend entirely too much time and effort blocking sites and policing for plagarism. (At the risk of sounding hypocrital, I do appreciate the spam filter. I read it daily since communication from parents and experts from other countries are often blocked, but I like it being in a separate folder.) Instead, we should be capitalizing on teachable moments and creating plagarim-proof assignments.

Most of the articles listed in 11.5 Thing #11 talked about modeling the thinking processes used to evaluate web resources and web tools. I think that's right on. Modeling is so key to good teaching. It's the same good strategy whether you're thinking through a math problem or trying to find information on the web. What would be a good tool to use to solve this problem? Why use this one? Now that I'm using it, how do I get the most out of it?

Certainly we don't have to think aloud all the time, but we do need to do it. It is worth the extra time! We need to address choosing the right tool, evaluating what we find, using the tool appropriately, etiquette, and safety. These can be integrated into most content learning experiences, we just have to make a point to do it.

 things to tell my students

  • you gotta use the right tool for the job (It's pretty difficult to loosen a screw with a hammer.)
  • you can't believe everything you see or read (The sky is bright red. I wrote it - so look outside, is it suddenly true? I can edit a picture to make a sky bright red. You see an image of it, is it true?)
  • take pride in your work (It's usually faster to do a good job the first time than to do a lazy job and have to do it again.)
  • manners matter online, too (Poor manners can be forever saved electronically. Who wants that legacy?)
  • people aren't necessarily who they say they are online(Never get in a car with a stranger. Same rule applies here.)

 

posted by atxteacher  


I found a definition of digital citizenship that I like: "Living, safely, civilly, and effectively in our increasingly digital world". A citizen works FOR and benefits FROM a larger society. To me the first issue is always personally safety. We need to stress over and over that you can pretend to be ANYONE of ANY AGE on the computer. The second most important element is determining the validity of information found. Most of us (including me) like to just stop once we have found what we are looking for and not spend much time verifying the information on multiple sources. Below is a list of what Digital Citizenship encompasses.

Digital Access

Digital Commerce

Digital Communication

Digital Literacy

Digital Etiquette

Digital Rights and Responsibilities

Digital Health and Welfare

Digital Security 

Posted by techgoddess  


I think with the age group I teach, 6th grade, my most important lesson is to teach by example. If I credit online sources and require that they do, it teaches in an indirect way what acceptable behavior would be. If I discuss safe passwords, appropriate content, etc. it would be in the context of a specific assignment.

Here's my question: How do you get past "everyone does it" which seems to have affected even adults? 

Ms. F 

 

 


11: Digital Citizenship Lesson: Part I

The articles provided by our Lifeguards are really informative. I gained a much clearer and deeper understanding of the importance of sound training in digital citizenship for our students and teachers.

Before jumping into lessons with the students, I will do three things:

1. Offer classes as quickly as possible for our teachers in DC as well as some how-tos for creating virtual lessons and projects for our students. 

2. Create big bold posters for the classrooms, media center, and computer labs which outline and remind users about the basics of DC.

3. Create a quick straightforward survey for the students to take which will ascertain their knowledge and use of technology. I make too many assumptions because I don’t want to take the time to do this, but the DC lessons will be more effective if I know about what kids think and do. Many of the survey examples I see on the internet are about computer use in school. They are also long, tedious, wordy, and boring. I would rather know what technology the students are personally using and familiar with because I already know what they do (and don’t do) at school.

The survey has to be as quick, short, and to-the-point as possible, yet still give me a snapshot of what they really know about. I can’t get long and detailed or else I will receive “IDK” for an answer (chat for “I don’t care”). Maybe an example of some questions could be:

1. Have you ever used a Wii? Yes/No

2. Do you have a Wii in your home? Yes/No

3. Do you have a PS in your home? Yes/No

4. What are your top three favorite PS games? a.___ b.___ c.___

5. Do you have a cell phone? Yes/Not yet

6. Check the features your cell phone has: 

text messaging ___

camera ___

video ___

MP3 ___

PDA ___

GPS ___

Wi-Fi___

Touchscreen___

Bluetooth ___

Short questions, easy answers, and a topic that more or less interests them. I may need to include photos of the items I’m asking about.

#11: Digital Citizenship Lesson: Part 2

Jessica Stockel’s blog was really helpful to me in thinking about what needs to be included in DC lessons. Cyber-bullying and breaking copyright laws are the most glaring issues we face each day at our school, so we all have to be diligent in addressing them whenever the opportunity arises, whether as a formal class or as individual instruction and reminders. My formal lessons would address the following issues:

Definition and characteristics of a Digital Citizen in the digital world.

Present, define, discuss the SBISD Acceptable Use Policy.

Etiquette for digital social communication.

Internet safety : what to share or not share and with whom.

Cyber-bullying: how to recognize and report it.

Copyright laws: plagiarism, piracy, works cited, free share resources.

Valid websites vs. fake ones: how to determine the difference. 

posted by Cheryl 

 


Even though my library orientation packets are already printed for the start of school, I will definitely work in a discussion about digital citizenship. Subjects I would include are manners, safety, evaluating information, copyright, and the AUP. Regarding the AUP, I would engage the students in a discussion about why we have the rules rather than just posting the rules.

I like this activity that I accessed through the Ning in item 4 of this assignment. It's titled, "Digital Citizenship and the 21st Century Digital Compass Activity."

http://www.educ.ksu.edu/digitalcitizenship/CompassArt.pdf

Something I will do more of having read these articles and suggestions is model how I evaluate the websites I find for the students. There is never enough time to devote an entire lesson to website evaluation, but if I and other teachers model our use of technology, eventually the students will become better at it themselves. Having said that, I must admit that many of our teachers need to learn and model better technology use! I hope my principal will let me provide some staff development on Digital Citizenship.

posted by Cooking Librarian  


Digital Citizenship is basically teaching your students how to be good citizens online. This is so important since students will be spending more and more time online as they go on to middle and high school. Students need to know that everything they read online is not always 100% true!
 
My very first computer lab lesson is how to log in, find your SAN folder, and save a document to it. Digital citizenship will be my second lesson.
Some of my major teaching points will be....
1) Treat others the way you want to be treated. This means when commenting we need to remember the Tribes agreements(no put downs).
2) Internet safety- username and passwords, not posting personal information,etc.
3) Communication - When using the computer at home, tell your parents. If a website asks you to sign in/up, let your parents know before you sign up.
4. Plagiarism/copyright laws - Last year I had a students plagiarize information he was researching and I asked him about what he had written down and he didn't realize you can't just copy down what someone else's words from the Internet.
 
I plan on showing student's this website another blogger posted http://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/ to show them how website can appear to have real truthful information, but in reality is completly fiction. I believe there is a Disney Internet safety game out there...my students have done it in the past.I'll have to go Google it and find it...if anyone knows, please share that website. :)

posted byjchoy 

 


I agree that it's important to discuss/teach/review/stress the importance of being a good "digital citizen," and I like the terminology too. What a great way to explain the concept, much like being a good citizen in society. Makes perfect sense!

I focused mainly on the following articles:

1. National Educational Technology Standards (NETS-T) and Performance Indicators for Teachers AND National Educational Technology Standards (NETS-S) and Performance Indicators for Students

2. "Digital Literacy and the Classroom" on Rhonda's Reflections- Wandering Around the Web

3. The Cool Cat Teacher Blog

I found all of the articles helpful and insightful.

When encouraging my students to be good digital citizens, I will stress the importance of the following tips:

1. Students should always use technology in SAFE, legal, and responsible ways. 

2. Students should use technology to find, EVALUATE, and use information. Remember, not everything found on the internet is true or accurate. 

3. Students should push themselves to use technology and knowledge to develop NEW ideas. Cheating is cheating, whether off another students' paper or off the internet. Don't plagarize. 

4. Students should use technology to COLLABORATE with others for further learning...including collaborating long-distance. 

5. Students should be familiar with addressing multiple AUDIENCES using a variety of formats.

posted by weedin 

 


1. All student should be required to sign an AUP (Acceptable Use Policy) before using school computers. This should spell out exactly when they are allowed to use computers, for what reason, what they can or cannot do while on the computer and also copyright infringement &/or plagarism. I feel that this doesn't really happen. Students are forced to sign one, but they are not necessarily explained well enough to them. Also consquences should be addressed.

2. I feel we have a responsibility of keeping our students safe. If elementary or middle school students are allowed to access such sites as My Space or Facebook, they could be circumventing parental rules. They could be possiblity be opening themselves up to online predators. So a lesson about online safetly is crucial!

3. Credibility of data is also something that doesn't seem to be taught to students. They are not able to tell the difference between a credible site and one that isn't. 

4. We also need to make sure students understand copyright. Many students copy and paste, thus infringing upon copyright all the time. They are under the false misunderstanding that because it is posted on the internet it is available to anyone that wants it! Especially using pictures from Google!

5. I also feel that students should understand that using a computer at school is a privilege, not a necessity. If district or class guidelines are not followed, then the student needs to have definite consequences. It is not really any different than any discipline issue in the classroom. Although teachers seem on the whole not able to know how to handle such computer misuses! Certainly losing the computer privilege is a just consequence!

 posted by l'l bit 

 


I love to use the internet in my lessons and in my discussions I have with my classes. Because of the spontaneity of the moment, I have to constantly watch out for inappropriate material that comes across while we are looking for whatever it is we are looking for. I try to think out loud as I look for things, and I always spout the personal responsibility I must exercise while I use the internet with them. Whenever I say, "Nope, not appropriate," there's always that one kid who says something like, "I can do whatever I want," or "My parents don't care." I'm sure their parents do care, but unfortunately like many other issues in the world, it falls to the teachers to have to create the foundation of responsible decision making. 
One lesson, and as far as I'm concerned it is the best lesson I have ever learned or taught, is the Registers of Language. Only we would use the Registers to discuss and guide our internet activity. If you're not familiar with the registers, here's a quick rundown:
There are 5 Registers of spoken english language. Some languages, like Chinese have six. 
Frozen (Language that never changes like prayers, pledges, etc." 

 

Formal (Language used to inform, one speaker everyone else listens)

 

Consultative (Exchanges of information between two people)

 

Casual (Language used between friends, insider language)

 

Intimate (language between lovers)

 

Everything that comes out of our mouths, from prayers to profanity, fits in a register. The gist of the lesson is to teach the kids that they need to appropriate register for the given situation. 

 

When using language for whatever reason, a person can go up or down 1 register without offending someone. If that person skips a register, they've committed a social and sometimes serious faux pas. 
These same registers can be used to determine appropriate use of the internet. Like school, their use should be formal or consultative. If they use it for casual reasons, that wouldn't be so bad, but not appropriate. However, if they sunk to the intimate register, they're in trouble. 
It's amazing how quickly students pick up on these registers, and I think it would work for computer use as well. 
 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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